‘The 100’ Season 7 Episode 9 Review: “The Flock”

Indra tries to talk Shady into playing ball image c/o imdb.com

In the latest the 100, “The Flock,” we find out what the surface of Bardo looks like, how the new “Disciples” training is going, and the chaos on Sanctum.

Turns out Bardo is not Earth. Also, Indra is back!

The internet theory that Bardo is actually Earth but with everyone far below the surface may have suffered a critical blow in tonight’s episode, though I suppose there’s always a chance it could still be Earth. In any event, we finally get to see what the surface of Bardo looks like.

It’s a hellscape with the previous ruling species turned to crystal. Octavia appropriately points out the insanity of Anders’ “war” while Diyoza seems happy to fight the impossible fight.

We’ve got our usual split storylines tonight, though it’s much more evenly dispersed than I think previous episodes have been.

Bardo deals with Echo, Hope, Octavia, and Diyoza during their three-month training stint. Sanctum follows the fallout of Nikki’s coup.

Let’s summarize Bardo first:

Levitt is back! He’s helping Anders to train the ladies. He warns them that mind-fuckery is a coming, and indeed the Disciple training is all about the brainwashing. Turns out in order to win the war, Anders requires all of his soldiers to have strict emotional control, unflinching loyalty to the cause, and absolutely no personal connections.

Maybe part of the reason they can achieve this is because of the way they incubate babies. See, on Bardo, embryos are gestated outside of the womb in tubes. This would be handy in removing any emotional strings along with the village group approach of raising the kids once they are “de-glopped” (as Diyoza puts it). No parents = no “selfish” bonds. We even get to see the indoctrination of their children at school. Not too shabby.

Hope’s not feeling it, but Octavia and Diyoza try to explain that she has to play the part or it’s back to Penance to die. Echo, on the other hand, excels here, and a part of me wonders if she’s just excellent at playing the part required of her, or if she sincerely finds happiness in servitude of a cause. Echo is an assassin, doing things based on the whims of others without question is her entire job description. Her feelings, her thoughts, and her desires don’t matter, and, at Bardo, she’s praised for her ruthless devotion. Anders definitely likes her.

Levitt shares a nifty bit of info regarding some hidden bioweapons – Echo’s subtle response to this is the only clue she might be a fantastic actor. He also pays a private visit to Octavia for some much-anticipated sexy time. Gotta say, this is on-brand for our former Blood Queen, plus I don’t think she’s had any lovin’ since Lincoln died – not counting a temporary romp here and there.

The last test the four have to endure is a doozy. In order to prove their single-minded devotion to the cause, they go through a simulation that pits them against someone they love (though oddly it pits everyone against Hope). Hope is made to choose between her mother and Bardo, she chooses her mother, of course, which means she fails. Anders leaves her punishment up to Echo – his star pupil – who sentences her to five years on Penance.

Now for Sanctum:

Indra returns only to hear Nikki’s announcement that she’s got hostages and will kill them unless Raven, Russell, and Daniel Prime show up at the palace. Murphy wants to rush over and save Emori, but Jackson points out that’s stupid. When Indra arrives, Murphy manages to sell her on his plan, and, while she isn’t happy about it, they both head over to convince Shady (from here on out what I’ll be calling Sheidheda, because it’s more fun and less typing) to play ball. Shady pretends to be a reluctant pawn, even going so far as to help his “allies” in exchange for some other perks. Is there a requirement somewhere that every evil leader has to love chess?

Murphy and Shady show up at the palace, stalling for time while Indra uses Shady’s map to sneak in and save the people. Unfortunately, this involves Murphy and Emori confessing they are not Primes. Shady happily reveals who he is, sneering at the faithful who, naturally, don’t want to believe the truth. And, just when Nikki loses her patience and is about to kill Murphy, Indra and the cavalry show up to save the day.

Indra leaves Shady to be killed by Russel’s scorned followers, but it goes horribly. See, the Dark Commander knew Indra might do this, after all it would have been his move. He’s not fighting warriors, so it takes very little effort for him to kill or maim the dozen or so faithful that attempt to retaliate. Murphy realizes too late what Shady’s plan was and makes another mistake when he calls Russell by his real name: Sheidheda. Immediately Shady’s old crew (oh Indra, you didn’t think to maybe put Trikru people in charge of that???) opens the door and genuflects. This does not bode well for Indra but especially not for Murphy and Emori who are right there.

Oh, what an awesome episode! Mind fuckery, brutal slaughter, and even some sex! I have to say as glad as I am that this show is ending, I will miss so many of the characters. I don’t know if I could have done multiple seasons with Shady as an antagonist, but man, he is a fantastic final boss.

Seeing him go up against Anders is going to be a treat, or hell, even Indra – which is far more likely to be the head-to-head since Shady ruined Indra’s family. You see a lot of evil leaders on shows brag about how smart they are while they do the stupidest things, but Shady might really be a mastermind villain.

I’m very excited to see where this goes.

 

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